Get Inspired, Be Empowered Forums Access to Healthcare Reproductive Health & Rights Period poverty in India and how to tackle it?

7 replies, 7 voices Last updated by Manpreet Singh 3 years ago
  • Woospire
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    Tanima
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    @ta
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    Let us first discuss what is period poverty. Basically, it’s a global problem which constraints girls from having basic menstrual care and hygiene.
    But fire we should be clear that this is absolutely a global problem affecting both men and the directly or indirectly. How?
    When we’re talking about proper sanitization, it’s not one a menstrual necessities. And after the covid pandemic it’s certainly clear to us, I guess. Most part of our India of course doesn’t have that.
    Again indirectly less hygiene lead women to fatal disease like vaginal cancer. Now this easily avoidable fatal diseases increase the death rate day by day. Global fatality rate due to vaginal cancer is approximately 35%, if it’s diagnosed in primary stage, while it can become as 51% as ku women aren’t even concern about such a fatal disease. All over, it gives birth to the unequal sex ratio.
    Whatever, if we see, financially women can’t afford proper menstrual hygiene, neither anybody have concern about it. Using old clothes duration period is still a custom going on.
    Sanitary pads are becoming way more expensive due to ‘pink tax’ or ‘luxury tax’ grants upon these basic necessities for women. Federal police only make menstrual products free in 2018.
    Dry places don’t know proper water to drink, how will they manage it for menstrual hygiene!
    Now, when we’re talking about period poverty, we should not forget that it’s not only about financial instability, it’s about all those long held cultural believes and customs.
    Stigmatization of period, make women believe that have a basic biological process is sinful. In some village, it’s still a custom to keep the female discriminated until her periods are over. Some women claim to be so shameful about it that they can’t expose having their period to even their families.
    Now why it’s necessary to stop it?
    First period poverty increase women fatalities.
    Water problem and not having proper sanitization, leads girls to leave from school on these days.
    Over 800,million human happy menstruation daily. So, it’s a issue have more importance than we can think.

    What can we do to prevent it?
    We can ask our governments to provide such necessities without strip measure to distribute it put the lowest stage of society, as having proper water and sanitization is a human right.
    Taking measures after learning if they’re any wrong stigmatization is going on W to female having period, can prove a great step.
    The most importantly, government should make these necessities like sanitary pads and toilet paper tax free or with barely minimum and make them affordable to any financial state.
    Arranging campaigns to make some concern about menstrual necessities is highly recommend
    Distributing free pads is obviously a great initiative
    Though, if women convert to use menstrual cup, it’ll be cheaper and hygienic too.

    Anika
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    Period poverty is the lack of access to sanitary products, menstrual hygiene education, toilets, hand washing facilities, and, or, waste management.

    Period poverty has always been present in India. India always has had a backwards attitude towards menstruation. Girls are ostracized from regular activities during their monthly period. Society thinks that menstruation is something impure. As a result of this, girls miss school. A 2014 report by the NGO Dasra titled Spot On! found that 70 percent of mothers with menstruating daughters considered menstruation ‘dirty’. They are also supposed to be discreet about this and are not supposed to talk about menstruation around men.

    There is a lack of awareness on menstruation. Many girls who live in rural areas have no knowledge on periods until they get it for the first time. In fact, in the 2014 report of the NGO Dasra, they found that almost 23 million girls drop out of school due to a lack of menstrual hygiene, awareness and lack of sanitary products.

    In many poor areas, there are many who can’t afford sanitary products so they keep reusing the same material which is dangerous and causes infections. There is also a lack of water in these areas and a menstruating girl needs basic sanitation.

    What can be done is to make menstrual products of all varieties (such as tampons or menstrual cups) much easier to buy and make it more available all across India. They can raise more awareness. It not only helps girls understand more about menstruation, but boys can be more aware about periods which will help reduce the stigma around periods. They can introduce more water schemes to help conserve water. They can also build more toilets and hand washing areas to make it easier for women. Menstruation is nothing to be ashamed of.

    Yash Tiwari
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    @yash
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    India has a huge population of women. It has more than 12 million adolescent girls aged 15 to 19 years. Yet, 75% of them share the same problem of period poverty. The situation is grim especially in rural areas where people suffer from period poverty. Period poverty is not just about not having access to sanitary pads. It has become a part of the lives of many people, and their mothers, grandmothers, and great-grandmothers before them. Menstruation is a hygienic necessity. Everyone menstruates, and, everyone, men and women need and should have access to clean sanitary products. Even in the 21st century in a country like India women are still deprived of their basic right to sanitation.

    Reforms have been afoot to improve the situation but it has never been popular enough to stay in the consciousness of the public. The government should make it mandatory in all schools, colleges, and workplaces to bring awareness about menstruation and hygiene. It must widely spread the notion that there is nothing shameful or impure about periods. This will make people stop being ashamed and will make women take pride in their periods. The problem is a lack of affordable hygiene products for people with periods. Women in India are twice as likely to miss school because of menstruation as boys, and about a third of all women in the country have no access to sanitary napkins.

    Period poverty is a real issue and is not just limited to India alone. In many underdeveloped countries having your period means that you have nothing to assist you. Yes, the patriarchy is alive and kicking in these parts of the world. Many rural areas lack education, sanitary supplies, and even toilets. This affects both men and women but poor married women are often blamed for not being responsible with money or ‘something else wrong with them. But what’s even more important, by far, is that the lack of access to sanitary napkins means that girls miss school during their periods. A 2014 report titled ‘Spot on! Period poverty in India’, authored by the advocacy group Dasra for the NGO DKT India says that among the respondents in its survey 31 percent said they didn’t send their daughters to school because they had no access to pads.

    The consequences of this culture are wide-ranging. First, girls miss school while they are menstruating. This takes a toll on their education and means that they get lower qualifications than their male peers – which lags them in the job market. Second, if they do manage to finish school, many women are forced out of work when they begin menstruating – starting a cycle of unemployment and poverty. Despite efforts by governments and NGOs to normalize menstruation and make menstrual hygiene products more affordable, the fact is that more than half of Indian girls remain unprepared for menstruation. This is large because of ignorance about what happens during puberty.

    Semantee Chattopadhyay
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    You may know it as ‘periods’, ‘monthlies’ ‘aunty flow’, ‘that time of the month’ or even code red but menstruation is a natural and essential part of the reproductive cycle. Roughly half the human population has will experience it and there’s so much that we still don’t know about it. The Scottish government improve the availability of free period products, in public places. They have worked with third sector organisations to expand access to these products, for those on low incomes. It is the first country that is working towards eradicating period poverty.
    Period property is lack of menstrual education and lack of menstrual awareness and access to menstrual hygiene products. According to a recent survey of 13 different countries by global children’s charity plan international it was found that period property arises from the problems arranged around stock shortages and price increases and even give to difficulties in accessing water and basic services. With the pandemic and the lockdown and it’s only gotten worse. In India, only 12% of women have access to period products. It has been seen statistically in India that women do not have any kind of menstrual education before she hits menarche. Period positivity is essential for any society and its women to grow. India has bigger volumes to play on. Low-cost products are available but the quality is really bad and it’s available in the urban region. In rural India girls and women generally use cotton pads during menstruation. This is not only and hygienic but also uncomfortable. In rural areas, they have to choose between asking for a meal or asking for a sanitary pad. This is the worst thing that can happen to any human being. Women have to be empowered to choose for themselves that which product works better for them. Swachh Bharat has mentioned menstrual hygiene as one of their core element but the implementation of that scheme is so poor that the adolescent girls are not able to get the education. The shame and taboo are so strong that it stopped one to provide and implement this kind of schemes. Both girls and boys receive sex education and menstrual education.

    PALAK KASHIV
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    Period poverty is a measure issue in our country, period poverty basically means females do not have enough money to buy pads, tampons, and other menstruation essential, our government needs to remove the charge of non-essential goods because every woman gets menstruation each month, and women who earn per day and have very few money they will obviously give priority to food and to children, it would be better if cotton pads will sell at generic medical stores for free so women at least will go there and buy it. Menstrual hygiene is very important because women have to live in the unhygienic condition it becomes really difficult during periods when they change the pads, so government should hire people to clean the toilets and can make more mobile toilet in cities and also in rural areas because in the city we can see toilets but in the village, they are there is more need in village. We can tackle period poverty by generating funds from the big corporation and government bodies under social responsibility and this big private firm will not deny from giving some amount of funds. There is a lot of international communities for period poverty we can tie up with them and sponsor some village which has most percent of period poverty.

    DISHA SAPKALE
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    @42disha
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    Period poverty is becoming major problem in our society because women are not aware of menstrual hygiene and menstrual education they are not using sanitary pads which lead to their health problems. Woman Should get aware of menstrual education due to which they will atleast get knowledge about menstrual health. For women’s menstrual hygiene their should be availability of free sanitary pads. Because there are women who can’t afford sanitary pads and it is necessary to provide free sanitary pads for women. To stop period poverty it will be great step towards it, by providing free sanitary pads. It is natural thing that every women goes through, it should be normalise in our society to talk about menstrual problems freely. In villages many women are not aware of sanitary pads and don’t have knowledge about menstrual hygiene or menstrual education. They use cloth or ash instead of sanitary pads due to which It gets affect their vaginal area with infections like dermatitis, urinary tract infection (UTIs). In rural areas the cases of menstrual problems are increasing day by day because of not having proper knowledge about menstrual hygiene. Their should be campaigns and organizations of menstrual education and menstrual hygiene for women in rural areas. So that they will take care of their menstrual hygiene and campaigns should also explain the importance of using sanitary pads through which atleast they will starting using sanitary pads instead of cloth. And in villages also their should availability of free sanitary pads due to which women will not think of money for menstrual hygiene. And women will no more get affect from such infections during periods. While travelling also their should be clean and sanitize toilet for women’s menstrual hygiene. Women should not use one pad for a whole day it will get affect their vaginal area they should keep changing their sanitary pad twice or thrice in a day. These solutions will surely help to tackle period poverty in india.

    Manpreet Singh
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    @manpreet
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    The lack of access to menstruation education and sanitary supplies is commonly defined by the poverty period. This is a topic that affects half of the world’s population with 800 million women and girls every day. However, in India, only 42 percent of women have access to health pads, the problem is very severe. How is this prevalent problem addressed? Here are the five most important facts concerning poverty in India during the period. In India, 70% of the disorders caused by menstruation hygiene are thought to be inferior. As a substitute for sanitary pads, women often use filthy sticks. Even cleaned rags may still produce bacteria if they are not properly dried. In addition, in India, 63 million young girls have no access to toilets at home. Girls are less likely to maintain their own hygiene correctly without a smooth private room for changing menstruation products. In India, menstruation is often regarded as a shame. Studies estimate that until after the first period 71% of girls are unfamiliar with menstrual health. Women are typically referred to as “unclean” during menstruation and are usually split in the home whether they dine, pray or participate. Some research has shown that gender standards are more prominent in puberty. There is also no necessary menstruation health curriculum in school. : The expenses of menstruation products are third on the list of the top five facts about poverty in India. Some 70,62 million Indiaans live under $1.90 dollars a day in deep poverty. For menstrual products the typical female Indian needs 300 rupees ($4,20) every month. The expense of sanitation pads is sometimes unachievable for low-income households. Moreover, as many teenagers do not have access to toilets at home, girls are more inclined to pay for toilets in public, a further inconvenient cost. On the basis of shame around their periods or lack of sanitary goods, females miss six days of class per month. This contributes to the fact that in India, over 23 percent of females drop out of school each year. Girls who abandon school are more likely to be child brides and stunted in their careers. The world’s most children’s brides are in India and 15.5 million youngsters by age 18 are married.

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