Get Inspired, Be Empowered Forums Water & Sanitation Periods still a taboo in India?

Tagged
4 replies, 5 voices Last updated by Anas Khan 11 months ago
  • Samriti Sharma
    Participant
    @samriti
    #33624

    That would be a big yes, Mensuration or periods as we generally call them are considered taboo in India because of some socio-cultural and religious beliefs. It is an ancient believe system which is still prevalent in some parts of India that a woman becomes impure during her menstrual cycle, while on her menses she is prohibited to enter into religious places, perform various other activities and is treated like an untouchable for a particular period of time. This taboo of excluding women from social events is actually embarrassing and a form of harassment.
    With the educated masses it here becomes relevant That the society today understands that Mensuration are completely normal and a part of life for women which should be proudly accepted rather than being something to be ashamed of.We as people should stand up in unity and should freely talk about periods educating those who unknowingly are criticizing the same.

    Aditi Sahu
    Participant
    @aditi
    #33632
    Helpful
    Up
    0
    Down
    Not Helpful
    ::

    Periods are a simple biological process that almost every woman goes through on a monthly basis. So something that is as common for half the population, one would think it must so normalised, but sadly that is not the case. Periods have been and remain till this day a taboo in India. A conversation centred around periods has always been a matter of hush-hush. With increase in the literacy rate and the education of people in general, something as normal as periods should have become a very comfortable thing by now, but unfortunately, our society has failed to treat this normal biological process as normal, instead they treat it as something that is very shameful and impure.

    Menstruation myths are still very common in almost every household in India. In some Indian households women are not allowed to enter temple, while in the other, they are considered so impure that they are not even allowed to touch food or enter the kitchen. We, as a society, should be ashamed of ourselves that we treat this natural process with such disgust and stigma. We are definitely trying to educate ourselves on different issues, but in the matter of periods, we still have a long way to go. We need to educate ourselves and the people around us that periods are just a simple body process that half the population goes through, it is not supposed to be pure or impure! It is just what it is. We need to get rid of the stigma surrounding periods make it such a normal topic that it can even be brought up in a dinner table conversation.

    038 deepika Singh
    Participant
    @038-deepika
    #33991
    Helpful
    Up
    1
    Down
    Not Helpful
    ::

    It’s 2022 and periods are still considered a taboo in India. A menstruating women is considered as impure. Menstruation has always been surrounded by myths and taboos in India. Such taboos about menstruation present in many societies, impact on girls’ and women’s emotional state, mentality and lifestyle and most importantly, health.

    In India, it is almost impossible to have a normal conversation on the topic of periods and even to this date the cultural and social influences appear to be a hurdle for advancement of knowledge on the subject. Many women are restricted to perform several activities during the time of their periods. In rural areas, some girls are not even allowed to enter the kitchen during the time of menstruation. They are considered un-hygienic and dirty and even the food prepared by them is considered contaminated. Girls are restricted from offering prayers, entering religious places and reading holy books.

    Instead of acknowledging the health related issues associated with menstruation, people pay more attention to the myths and try their best to adhere to it. Due to the same reason a large number of girl in rural areas in India drop out of their school as soon as they begin menstruating. The first and foremost strategy in this regard is raising awareness among girls related to menstrual health and hygiene. In India, young girls grow up with limited knowledge about menstruation as their own sisters and mothers shy away from discussing such topics with them. Periods is nothing but a natural and healthy biological process and it is high time that we break these taboos and normalize talking about it.

    Afshan Iqbal
    Participant
    @afshan
    #34100
    Helpful
    Up
    0
    Down
    Not Helpful
    ::

    Period was a topic that has remained behind closed doors and was only discussed by women. Things have changed drastically since then but still period or menstruation has remained a taboo in our country. Mensuration is perceived as unclean or embarrassing, inhibiting even the mention of menstruation whether in public or in private especially in the presence of men. A thing as natural as menstruating is associated with such shame or embarrassment baffles me. Menstruating is like urinating or breathing despite this it’s taboo!! It is a wondrous process, giving rise to the capacity to conceive and give birth. There is no human race without it. The taboo around periods makes it difficult to talk about the complications that come up with it like uterine cramps, backaches, and emotional turmoil. Periods can hurt and derail girls from their daily activity, it is uncomfortable and messy. It affects girls when they are ashamed of their blood-soiled clothing. Girls are always afraid to talk about periods in public and they have a fear of embarrassment while they are at school during their periods. It is such a big taboo that till now we see girls buying sanitary pads from a place where there are women sellers or taking sanitary napkins in black non-transparent bags away from people’s eyes to escape embarrassment. We are in a time when new inventions are making the world better and smarter but when it comes to period or menstruation the stigma remains the same. Things are changing as social media has emerged as a new platform for raising voices but there are people who still consider periods taboo. We need to change and it will only happen if we freely discuss periods as a natural biological function in a respectful and positive way, smashing taboos together.

    Anas Khan
    Participant
    @anas
    #34658
    Helpful
    Up
    0
    Down
    Not Helpful
    ::

    As of my knowledge cutoff in September 2021, menstruation, or “periods,” has been a topic shrouded in taboos and cultural stigmas in India for centuries. However, it is important to note that societal attitudes and perceptions can change over time, and the situation may have evolved since then.

    In India, the taboo around menstruation has been deeply ingrained in cultural, religious, and social practices. Menstruating women have often been considered impure, and as a result, they face various restrictions and discriminatory practices. These include being excluded from religious activities, not being allowed to enter temples or kitchens, facing limitations on social interactions, and even being isolated during their menstrual cycles. Such practices perpetuate the idea that menstruation is shameful and something that should be hidden.

    Fortunately, there has been a growing movement in recent years to break the silence surrounding menstruation and challenge these taboos. This movement has been fueled by various factors, including education, activism, and the efforts of nonprofit organizations. The widespread reach of media and the internet has played a significant role in raising awareness and promoting open discussions about menstruation.

    One of the landmark initiatives in India was the introduction of the Menstrual Hygiene Scheme by the government, which aimed to provide sanitary napkins to girls in rural areas. This initiative not only focused on accessibility but also played a crucial role in normalizing conversations about periods and educating both girls and boys about menstruation.

    Furthermore, several grassroots organizations and activists have been working tirelessly to tackle period stigma. They have been conducting workshops, distributing sanitary products, and engaging with communities to challenge the myths and misconceptions surrounding menstruation. Additionally, films like “Pad Man” and “Period. End of Sentence.” have also helped bring the issue into the mainstream and spark conversations.

    While progress has been made, it is essential to recognize that India is a diverse country with varied cultural and regional beliefs. Thus, the extent of the taboo and the pace of change may vary across different communities and regions. Continued efforts are necessary to ensure that the conversation around menstruation evolves further, breaking down remaining barriers and creating an environment of acceptance, dignity, and equality for all menstruating individuals.

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.