4 replies, 4 voices Last updated by Yash Tiwari 2 years, 7 months ago
  • Woospire
    Keymaster
    @admin
    #32910
    Semantee Chattopadhyay
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    @semantee03
    #32943
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    What is the one issue that unites all religions in this country? Of course, it is their mutual hatred for homosexuality. The supreme court had struck down Section 377 in the year 2018, effectively decriminalizing homosexuality. Unfortunately for most of our country the difference between homosexuals and homeopathy is not very clear. Homophobia turns out to be rather new to our country. We may not want to accept it now but ancient Indians weren’t exactly subtle about same-sex love being a part of their culture. Temple that was constructed between the 6th and 14th centuries in South India often featured erotic images of men and women flashing each other. Ancient India was more woke than us. Gender fluidity is a common theme that runs through a majority of our ancient texts. Men turned into women, women turned into men. Same-sex love in India sites the example of the first Mughal Babur who was also said to have a certain affinity for a young boy named Bamburi. Even composed the poem for the young lad.
    Being a member of the LGBTQ community in India is extremely difficult. It cannot be expected from a person to live peacefully in a country where they are constantly bullied or denied jobs just of their sexual orientation. Every single person who is a part of the LGBTQ community or the straight allies know that people are India are quite homophobic. They use the terms gay, lesbian, transgender as cuss words. They are judged based on how they dress or talk or whom they love. The country that celebrates independence Day and its freedom does not recognise how oppressed these people are. Many businesses are starting to recognize the benefits of including lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people, yet this country does not provide any legal protections against workplace discrimination.

    DISHA SAPKALE
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    @42disha
    #32971
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    LGBT (LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL & TRANSGENDER). When our country got freedom, the constitution writer promised everyone for equality in our society but till now days LGBT didn’t get any equality as we compare to other genders, In recent few years LGBT rights is evolving fastest then before, In india there are 25 lakhs+ Gay population which is 7% of whole population, This is only what Ministry of health known But there are more than this because many didn’t openly accepted because of society and if we calculate lesbian, bisexual & transgender there are more than A million. In Bollywood movies they only use LGBT person just for comedy, Always who ever role as LGBT person in movies they poetry as a entertainer. In between us there are also many LGBT members who living a good life. Section 377 was written by indian British government in 1861, Section 377 means if whoever intercourse the order of nature with any man, women and animal will going to punish for 10 years in a prison, In 2009 Delhi high Court cancelled this section but in 2012 supreme court again bring this section. There are many stereotypes against LGBT member which is mental & physical disease, against religion/culture, unnatural, causes aids, dangers of national securities, western conspiracy. LGBT community goes through with lots of problems like inequality, stereotypes, discrimination, not treating them equally at workplace. Inspite of all these their is a celebration called as pride month which is celebrated in the month of June. The celebration is all about equality, people acceptance, equal awareness of LGBT community rights, education for LGBT community, awareness of issues that are affecting LGBT community. So that atleast some people in our society will start accepting LGBT community by knowing about the importance of pride month. Being LGBT in india is hard because of the society discrimination and inequality towards LGBT community.

    Manpreet Singh
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    @manpreet
    #32973
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    Today, homosexuality and queer identities may more than ever welcome Indian youth, but the acceptance of their sexuality and their right to express their choices publicly remain an ongoing fight for LGBT people within the limits of family, home, and schools. (Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender). Through urban India, which has brought greater sensitivity to LGBT rights in social media and corporate initiatives, gay males find it easier to do this than transgender or lesbian women. Although urban LGBT voices are an important aspect of LGBT advocacy and heard through numerous online and real-world platforms, these expose only a little of the diversity have faced a lot. Far from gay pride parades, meetings, and heated talks on Twitter, rural Indian families have their own approach to LGBT people. Secret honor murders are arranged in some places so that only a young gay guy can survive, without money or social assistance, by the cover of the night to some town.
    Lesbian women in other sections are susceptible to family corrective violations, which often take place through their own families. Vyjayanti Vasanta Mogli of the Tata Institute of Social Sciences, a Trans-Woman LGBT and public policy scholar in Hyderabad, who talked openly about her school abuses, says que lesbian women and transfers in the rural areas end up at the bottom of the hierarchy as far as the basic human rights of family and village are concerned. Self-suicides by lesbian women are published in educated urban India each year. No wonder a court decided lately that lesbians in India are solely threatened by their families.
    A recent study has indicated that parental response to homosexuality is one of the primary factors leading to the stigmatization of LGBT persons. The study concludes that many LGBT people only agree to behave like heterosexuals if they consent to their families. Prince Manvendra Singh Gohil is presently leading numerous projects to support LGBT persons, including the Lakshya Trust, which works for HIV/AIDS Prevention in an LGBT community. The narrative of this trust is well reported in the media in recent years. He adds that LGBT individuals shouldn’t take what they see in the media away. The lack of family support can prove to be a major blow for LGBT’s physical and mental health in a culture bordered by a tight set of social and cultural norms that determine the terms and circumstances for education, profession, and marriage. Isolation and conforming pressure often lead to sadness, suicidal thinking and psychosomatic disorders. Many want to migrate to another town to stay away from the enormous marriage pressure and to begin a family.

    Yash Tiwari
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    @yash
    #32975
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    There are a lot of myths and half-truths about the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) community. Most Indian parents are still largely ignorant of the LGBT community and their sexuality. There is also a great amount of confusion within the LGBT community itself. Many still struggle between coming out to their parents and decide to keep it hidden, while others do not know how to approach or express themselves to those around them. Coming Out is a process for most LGBT individuals, but in India, it is fraught with many hurdles and obstacles. These range from lack of awareness about gender identities and sexual orientations to social stigma and criminal offense.

    While the Indian Constitution, which was adopted in 1950, unequivocally states that “the state shall not discriminate against any citizen on grounds only of religion, race, caste, sex”, it fails to affirm lesbian and gay Indians. Article 377 of the Penal Code is a remnant of British colonial rule and a vestige of Victorian morality. The Indian history is naked proof of the acceptance of gender and sexual diversity by many cultures, but with the coming of the colonialists, homo-eroticism was interpreted as a sign of civilizational decadence, leading to many being social outcasts.

    In India, LGBT issues are widely considered a western import into Indian culture, even as evidence of an urban, globalized, and liberal outlook. This attitude leads to a reluctance to acknowledge or address the issues facing homosexuals in Indian society. With a few exceptions, Indian society has traditionally been conservative and anti-LGBT and this limits notions of family and marriage to heterosexual monogamous ones. The moment a woman or man is suspected to be homosexual, they face ostracism and discrimination. Respecting privacy and avoiding questions about their personal life keeps most people closeted.

    For many in India, the current struggle is to merely come to terms with their sexuality. For others, it is to prove that LGBT people actually exist where they live, despite being hidden for centuries. For still others, it is striving for acceptance from family and friends. In short, it’s a struggle to be human despite yourself. On the other hand, you might be surprised by how much tolerance there is for LGBT individuals in other parts of India.

    Sometimes people grow up in India never knowing that there are other people out there like them. For many young LGBT Indians, this lack of role models can be a real problem because it gives them only one way of seeing themselves: as outsiders. They don’t have anyone to show them different ways of being gay that might make it easier for them to live. The Indian Supreme Court’s historic ruling decriminalizing homosexuality last September has been hailed by many as the biggest step toward equal rights for LGBT people in India. But despite its progressive nature, the verdict remains a far cry from legal empowerment for the queer community.

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