Get Inspired, Be Empowered Forums Sexism & Patriarchy Imbalanced sex ratio affects women the most. Discuss.

5 replies, 5 voices Last updated by Manpreet Singh 9 months, 1 week ago
  • Woospire
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    Yash Tiwari
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    The sex ratio at birth ‘is the number of males born compared to 100 females’. Worldwide there are nearly 49% more boys than girls. Although this sounds like a lot, it is necessary to maintain population levels and avoid extinction. Nearly one in five people worldwide is between the ages of 15 and 30, and a third is below 21. Women slightly outnumber men at younger ages, but not at older ages. More than half of the world’s 1 billion people over age 60 are women. By 2030, the number of people around the globe over age 60 is expected to increase to 1.5 billion. Female life expectancy is greater than male life expectancy almost everywhere in the world.

    The effects of a finite sex ratio are more pronounced on women because, unlike men, they cannot reproduce themselves without the help of another human. In China and India, the countries with the most contribution to the world’s sex ratio, there is sometimes as few as one baby boy for every four baby girls born. This means fewer potential mates for women when they reach an age where they want to get married and have children. Except for Europe, which has a less imbalanced ratio, and is more egalitarian, the male to female sex ratio for the world is 109 males to 100 females. In contrast, when measured by proxy indicators such as economic activity or education there is a much higher incidence of gender ratio discrepancy. This is because males are both more likely to die at an earlier age and more likely to leave school before completing their education.

    Women are treated as second-class citizens in many regions. Single female parents are marginalized as well. In many countries, women and their daughters face honor killings and early marriage. These harsh conditions make it hard for women to find a suitable mate. Because of this gender imbalance, more women are forced to marry men they are not interested in because the chance of finding another man who will consent to marry them is very low. The discrimination that is shown towards women in these countries is actually what’s causing many other problems such as the higher suicide rate among women, lower psycho-social health, etc.

    If we want to fix the problem, it’s essential to understand what’s causing it. There is a popular misconception that it’s the wealthy, modern, first-world nations (the US, UK, Canada, and Australia) which have these gender issues. That’s not true: as countries become wealthier, they tend to show a larger imbalance in favor of boys.

    nehachitroda
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    The imbalanced sex ratio is where one gender is less in ratio than the other, like the women’s ratio is less, there’s an unequal sex ratio between males and females. The sex ratio is the ratio of males to females in a population, but in India, there’s an imbalance sex ratio because still in the 21st century many of them prefer the male child to a female.
    Ratio imbalance can be seen at birth i.e., primary sex ratio, before the birth of a child, the sex of the child is determined and if it’s a girl then there are cases of abortion of child killing inside the womb of the mother. The imbalanced sex ratio affects women because it is a serious social problem, which is unfortunately created by we humans.
    The number of females is less than men, female from ancient times were not preferred, and still, many don’t prefer now too. Thoughts and preferences of people can’t be changed by just saying, but each human should understand precisely that there’s nothing as males are best than females, both are equally humans and both are to be valued.

    Tanima
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    Gender ratio, according to anthropology and demography the ratio of males to females in population is called sex-ratio or gender-ratio. An ideal sex ratio is 1:1, though practically it’s like 1.06:1.06 and only a few countries have succeeded to maintain it. Most of countries are suffering from imbalanced sex-ratio and sadly India is one of them having approx 900 females per 1000 men with Chhattisgarh holding the highest and Haryana having lowest number of females, according to the data of 2014-’15.
    Cause of this disbalance? Of course everyone of us might have imagined it.
    Yes, female foeticide comes first. Our Indian families are having so much gender discrimination and only desire for a boy leads to this crime. With these, lack of health and sexual awareness, being judgemental about sex oriented issues, not taking care of maternal health are the most leading factors of having less women.
    But why’s that so important? Why should we be concern about that?
    The large cohort of ‘surplus’ men are affected by lack of marriageability . And the consequent marginalization of society leads to arrogant anti-social behavior. Women are feeling inferior day by day and an Imbalanced sex-ratio is also a cause of that. Social stability is being stroke down. Men are continuing their patriarchal behavior to cage a woman, means the weak in numbers. Women exploitation, sexual harassment, gender discrimination is increasing rapidly.
    We have to be more concerned about the disbalance as it’s not only a mathematics problem which can be kept unsolved, it’s effects are much harrasing than we can ever imagine. In a patriarchal society, that India have, for women empowerment, we have to solve this issues, else it’ll just be a propaganda and we’ll keep post it on placard, Facebook walls but nothing’s gonna change at all.

    Mayuravarshini Mohana
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    The Gender ratio in the world in 2019, according to UN World Population Prospect, is 101.69 males per 100 females. Yet, it has been estimated globally, that there are more females than males. The discrepancy is owed to India and China, the two most populated countries in the world, whose significantly higher male population has reined in the number of women in excess.

    India’s imbalanced sex-ratio can be traced to factors such as sex-selection, son-preference, female foeticide and female infanticide. Girl children are considered burdensome due to existing patriarchal convictions where violence against females and cultural practises such as the dowry system discourage parents from begetting daughters. Besides, the social system of marriage where the bride moves into the he groom’s house, guarantees financial support and stability only to the son’s parents well into their old age. All these factors coalesce to promote the disproportionate increase in male children in India.

    The decrease in females has largely been achieved through female infanticide. The advent of technology, in the later part of the 20th century, facilitated sex-determination and sex- selection. This allowed parents to either select the sex of the child or opt for abortion, drastically tipping the sex-ratio towards male population.

    To put it plainly, we have more men than women. India has an average of 108.18 males per 100 females.Sex-ratio has been identified as an important determinant of social behaviour. An imbalance can strongly influence crime rates, significantly unsettling harmony and balance of justice in society. One of the immediate social consequences is an increased exercise of control on women, which in turn amplifies the incidence of domestic violence. The dearth of women increases male-male aggression and, thanks to patriarchy, controlling women is adopted as a more effective way of beating the competition.

    Marriage Squeeze, which is an imbalance in the number of men or women available for marriage, is another inevitable consequence. The decrease in number of brides results in abduction and trafficking of women, who are then sold to families with prospective grooms.

    Imbalance of sex ratio, irrespective of which gender outnumbers the other, ultimately affects women in the form of violence and increased oppression. If women were in greater numbers, the excess of brides in question will mean that not all women can marry. One only needs to remind oneself of the prevalent social stigma around unmarried women to discern their eventual plight. Moreover, the institution of marriage would become even more lucrative to the groom’s side, placing excessive economic strain on the bride’s family.

    Either ways, women are on the receiving end of injustice. Government schemes such as Beti Bachao Beti Padhao and Thottil Kuzhandhai Thittam (Cradle Baby Scheme) taken at the national and state levels have helped tackle the issue. Yet, it takes lot more than government intervention to promote the welfare of women. It can only be resolved if gender justice becomes a collective and expansive social movement, actively led by the people.

    Manpreet Singh
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    The World Health Organization states that the ratio of natural sex at birth is approximately 105 boys every hundred girls. For balance, you need some more kids, as men have died sooner. For example, throughout several decades, sex at birth was significantly higher than 105, occasionally topping 120 young people per 100 girls in China, the world’s most populous country. Many sections of India, the second-most populous country, had a sex ratio at birth considerably higher than 105 for decades. As a result, there are currently an estimated 80 million additional men in these merged countries, which have a population of almost 2,73 billion. In India, many families have utilized sex-selective abortion to chose males, leading to the enactment of a law that prohibits sex screening and abortions of the fetus. The ‘one-child policy used between 1979 and 2015, which pushed many parents to determine that their lone child must be an infant, has promoted similar decisions in China. The common thread is gender discrimination—from gardening to practical reasons that children are more likely to support parents financially in their old age and provide grandkids, while girls should live with their in-laws—which is hardly uniquely China and India. It is no surprise that when women are lacking equal rights and patriarchy is well entrenched, parents prefer not to have children. But the effects are there. For example, China presently is seeking a woman—a bride deficit—a gender imbalance that is vast and widening throughout generations. Experts believe that many additional guys will never marry, while others can take tremendous lengths to do so. One such impact in 2019, a report centered on bridal trafficking from Myanmar to China, was examined by Human Rights Watch. Bordering on China, in Myanmar’s Kachin and northern Shan countries, the long-standing conflict has escalated to over 100,000 people in recent years. Vulnerable girls and women are being trafficked and posted in and transported to China. Then they sell the Chinese families fighting to find their sons’ spouses for from $3,000 to $13,000. Upon the purchase, women and girls are usually imprisoned in a room and raped over and over again, in order to get their babies pregnant soon. Some people are able to flee after they have been born, but are compelled to leave their kids. In Cambodia, North Korea, and Vietnam, there are also similar patterns of migration and trafficking of brides, and more may come from other borders with China. Only one result is trafficking. There are many other forms of violence towards women linked to the lack of women. Social insecurity, distortions of the labor market and economic upheavals are other repercussions. The effects of women deficiencies must promptly be mitigated by China, India, and other countries affected. The repercussions of women’s scarcity, including linkages to trafficking and other types of violence against women, should be properly examined. More crucially, the root cause of the demographic imbalance – gender discrimination and hatred for the children it creates – needs to be addressed much more.

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