Get Inspired, Be Empowered Forums Access to Education Changing the course of education

3 replies, 4 voices Last updated by Sanskriti Singhal 8 months ago
  • Archana A S
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    @archana
    #35098

    Should school education in India be just mugging up lessons and spitting them in exams? Isn’t it high time the course of education should be changed to teach children all the necessary skills that give them the perspective to analyze their interests and grow accordingly?

    Akanksha Pathak
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    @akanksha-2
    #35106
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    The question of whether school education in India should focus on rote memorization and regurgitation of information or shift towards a more comprehensive approach that nurtures critical thinking and personal growth is an important one. Many argue that it is indeed high time to change the course of education and provide students with the necessary skills and perspectives to analyze their interests and grow accordingly.

    Rote memorization has long been a predominant feature of the Indian education system. Students are often encouraged to memorize vast amounts of information without fully understanding the underlying concepts. This approach can hinder the development of critical thinking, problem-solving abilities, and creativity. It promotes a surface-level understanding of subjects rather than fostering a deeper comprehension and application of knowledge.

    In today’s rapidly changing world, there is a growing recognition of the need to equip students with skills that go beyond rote learning. By adopting a more holistic approach to education, schools can help students develop skills such as critical thinking, communication, collaboration, creativity, and adaptability. These skills are essential for success in the modern workforce and in navigating the complexities of the world.

    A curriculum that encourages analytical thinking and exploration of personal interests can also foster a sense of curiosity and a lifelong love for learning. It can help students discover their passions, strengths, and areas of expertise. By providing a broader range of subjects, extracurricular activities, and opportunities for hands-on learning, schools can empower students to explore their interests and develop a well-rounded skill set.

    It is important to note that a shift towards a more comprehensive education system requires systemic changes in curriculum design, teacher training, assessment methods, and overall educational philosophy. It requires a shift from a focus on exam-oriented results to an emphasis on holistic development and individual growth.

    In conclusion, it is indeed high time to rethink the course of education in India. Moving away from a rote memorization approach towards an education system that nurtures critical thinking, personal growth, and skills development can better prepare students for the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century. By providing students with the necessary tools to analyze their interests and grow accordingly, we can create a more enriching and empowering educational experience.

    apeksha tanwar
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    @apeksha
    #35305
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    It is completely true that the approach of relying solely on rote learning and regurgitation of information in exams is a topic of concern when discussing school education in India. This method, which often prioritises memorisation over comprehension, has been criticised for various reasons.
    Firstly, this rote learning approach limits the development of critical thinking skills among students. Instead of encouraging independent thought and analysis, students are often trained to come up with the information without fully understanding its context. This hampers their ability to think critically, solve problems, and engage in meaningful discussions.
    Secondly, such an exam centric system places undue pressure on students to perform well in standardised tests. The focus on memorisation and scoring high marks can lead to a narrow understanding of education, where success is measured solely by grades. This can create a competitive environment that may not foster creativity, or holistic development. Additionally, this method may not effectively equip students with the necessary skills for the real world. Today’s world demands individuals who can think critically, communicate effectively, work in teams, adapt to new situations, and demonstrate creativity. Rote learning alone may not adequately prepare students for these challenges. It is high time for a shift towards a more comprehensive education system in India. This includes a focus on developing critical thinking, problem solving, creativity, and communication skills. By encouraging students to explore their interests, fostering a love for learning, and providing practical applications of knowledge, education can become more relevant and engaging.
    Assessment methods should also evolve to assess a student’s understanding, and creativity, rather than just their ability to invent information. This can be achieved through a combination of exams, projects, presentations, and practical learning.
    Teacher training and support are essential components of this transformation. Teachers need training and resources to adopt student centered teaching methods that promote critical thinking, creativity, and personalised learning experiences.
    In conclusion, the prevalent approach of rote learning and exam centered education in India should be reconsidered.

    Sanskriti Singhal
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    @sanskriti_1
    #35324
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    It is indeed very important to talk about the course of education in our country which is solely based on mugging-up the entire syllabus over and over, each year, without even understanding its practical basis. The ultimate goal of students is set to get the best grades. This idea is reinforced by parents and our educators who pack the young minds with the idea of only achieving quality grades, due to which, students think that education is just about scoring good and not about learning or acquiring skills.

    Despite all these harsh realities, we can not overlook the amendments made in our education system by a committee chaired by Dr K. Kasturirangan, in the form of National Education Policy 2020 (NEP 2020). With the implementation of this new policy, there’s been a great role assigned to Vocational Education, an education which promotes skill based learning unlike the traditional learning systems. The major reform of this policy are:

    1) the replacement of 10+2 structure by a 5+3+3+4 model
    2) no state language is imposed on students studying in any state
    3) students are permitted to take the Board Examinations twice

    This has been a great step by the government to induce changes in the traditional system of learning and promote skill based learning.

    Earlier, the government used to spend 1.7% of the country’s GDP on education, but now, the government will spend 6% of the country’s GDP on education, which is more than 3 times of the earlier accounts. Probably the government is now acknowledging the importance of education in everyone’s lives and the future of our country.

    We should always acknowledge the steps already taken by the government in improving the education conditions in our country and there’s always a hope for new and better adjustments in the field of education.

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