Get Inspired, Be Empowered Forums Gender Barriers and Solutions to Leadership Underrepresentation as leaders in health

8 replies, 9 voices Last updated by Devishi Tandon 5 months, 3 weeks ago
  • Woospire
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    Women make up 70 per cent of the health and social care workforce as nurses, midwives and community health workers. Yet, women remain in the background of decision making, underrepresented in health sector leadership, and missing from the centre of the COVID-19 response.

    Darshini Suresh
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    @darshinisuresh
    #30666
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    Today Although, women make up the majority or you can say more than half of the graduates at high grades in India, yet there are fortification of barriers which limit and restrict a woman’s entry into any kind of medical leadership and leadership related to health care domains. These restrictions have internalised the elements in a structural way which can be address through multiple strategies which would advance a role of woman in medical leadership.
    A woman plays an important role in building a wrong health work-force globally and at her own house. The word at her own can definitely have not been overlooked. The way they preach with dedication to their work which they practise can make a difference between like and death situations for so many people out there. And besides all this a woman in even though working more in the health force, has less pay compared to men. Can we call this DELIVERED BY WOMEN, BUT LEAD BY MEN?
    The covid 19 pandemic has bought a drastic impact on our society from unemployment to health factors and the economy globally. Even at the conditions of fighting covid 19 women have served tremendously in the form doctors, nurses, cleaners, etc. This excess of passion they show in working may lead them to cause infection or the virus risking their lives. It’s stated that infections among female Health work-force is three times more than that of the male workforce and yet women are made to behind whole decision makings.
    According to the recent reports by the UN, almost 70 to 75 percent of healthcare workforce comprises of women. According to statistical displayed by the WHO, nearly 3 trillian time the women have contributed towards healthcare and yet their works is paid less or unpaid. Women hold only 25 percent of a CEO position in a hospital in India in the Health sector department. There should be rallies set up to ensure more care on empowering women, because women make tough choices from the very less sources which they are actually offered.
    During the pandemic which we are actually going through, action must be taken against investment in leadership and placements for women which would scrutinise and we can be recognized as being a significant role in filling the gender gap role at the level of leadership. Training and teaching should be enhanced to future nurses and doctors. There should be structure long term change and more of women leaders In the field of health care should be recognized and addressed.

    nehachitroda
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    @nehachitroda
    #32364
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    UNDERREPRESENTATION AS LEADERS IN HEALTH
    Women, in spite of being not given any reward or credit for the work done still, continues each task and work without any partiality. Women are housewives but with that, they also are holding other positions excluding their home and family. But are they getting credit or are they given that position of being a leader?
    No, because people assume men as good leaders and women can’t be. But a large number of nurses, housemaids, cleaners which are very common among women’s job or we can duty, but still in that field also they are not represented as a leader. Their role hasn’t changed any time, in fact, each day their work is more burdened and they do it without any complaints.
    Covid 19 pandemic has wholly affected everyone regardless of anything in some or other way but women in the basic example at home still continued to do her work and in fact more than normal days. Many nurses, doctors, helpers, and cleaners in hospitals work each day so that we can all live safely. They can also get infected by this virus and it can also affect them but their families too, but underrepresented in this field too joins the list of other fields where women are not represented actually.
    There should be support and their work should be given recognition as they sacrifice and do their work sincerely and that’s all will make them more motivating and loyal towards their work.

    Yash Tiwari
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    @yash
    #32619
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    Women make up 70 percent of the health and social care workforce as nurses, midwives, and community health workers. Health care was one of the slowest sectors to integrate women into leadership, but it’s finally catching up to many other industries. However, hospitals and health systems are still struggling to promote women into leadership roles. There are several obstacles, including investment in leadership and placements for women which would scrutinize and we can be recognized as being a significant role in filling the gender gap role at the level of leadership.

    Some barriers prevent women from entering the field of healthcare towards promotion, medical leadership, and related domains, which in turn leads to the under-representation of women as medical leaders. Women are still underrepresented in leadership positions in health professions and health care is not yet seen as a truly female-friendly career. There is a need to look into these statistics and make women understand that the medical profession is their first choice and for this, we have to remove some constrictions like biasness in mindsets of people and gender-biased rules. There is no doubt that the women over here are getting into every walk of life these days, but this trend has failed to trickle down in the medical arena where women still are to face all kinds of barriers from male-dominant societies and cultures.

    There have been many cases of people dying or affected by this Ebola virus. Everyone in the world has been warned to be careful, but some people do not care at all. Especially in Africa, many women are fighting for their lives against the virus and they are showing a lot of courage, even if they get infected they continue to help injured ones till they die. Yet, women have been recognized locally and internationally as practitioners of traditional medicine who are known to utilize herbal plants for healing purposes. Traditional healers, and of course the women involved in such activities, have much to offer in combating the spread of diseases like Ebola and COVID-19.

    Women should not have to fight for health share, they should be in proportion. This is an ongoing pandemic with continuous short and long-term damage. There may be a permanent loss of time where the damage is done cannot be recovered. Hesitating any further to act is irresponsible. Women are in distinct shortage at health leadership roles in health. The consequences are evident in many sectors of the world. The underrepresentation of women has actually led to the pandemic which we are currently going through with far-reaching consequences for global health systems.

    Manpreet Singh
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    @manpreet
    #32710
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    It is not some hidden fact that during the present pandemic crises, women frontline workers have played a very critical role in arresting the covid-19 wave and making sure that most of the lives were saved. They have played an important role while doing nursing and other front-line worker duties. But sadly, their due is not paid as they as hardly represented and praised about their roles. Women have proved time and again that they have some great brains and they can perform medical jobs very efficiently. In most of the NEET exams, that is held every year, it is not uncommon to see a girl topper. Then why we are not seeing more women in the leadership role related to the medical sector?
    The problem lies in the fact that we still have patriarchal roots and they show their ugly presence in the workplace sector too. Women still have to face gender barriers and they have to struggle a lot in order to reach the top spot of the job. The male ego comes in their way. Male leaders are just not ready to leave their position, from where they have a lot of power advantage and no one wants to give up this privilege very easily. Despite the passing of the landmark judgment Vishakha vs State, giving instructions regarding the improvement of the workplace environment, and making it safer for the women, we still have not implemented them in spirit.
    We must realize the fact that we have a lot of unique talent in the form of the women workforce and we cannot afford to waste this talent at any cost. With their empathy and sense of care, women leaders in the medical sector can bring some revolutionary change as they understand the problem much better. So it is time that we make them leaders.

    PALAK KASHIV
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    @palak
    #32941
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    Many women in India are part of the health care sector they serve in hospitals being doctors, nurses, and community health workers. All women are real warriors they try to maintain hygiene and take care of patients like their family and make sure nobody gets infected or recover from disease fast, but still, they don’t get a chance to become leaders, why? Indian health care system is very partial towards its very disheartening when we hear from the news that women are not getting paid on time by working 24*7, and we all know the condition of Indian working women they have the responsibility of home after managing all this without a complaint they go the hospital, but still, they don’t get what they worth of its kind of frustrating from them it also somewhere demotivates women in health care especially for senior doctors, department of healthcare should implement a policy which can provide equal opportunities for men and women or for others so everyone can get recognition this problem will be solved. A lot of male leaders in health care do not want to give up their position because of their male ego issue they don’t like to follow the female leaders and take orders from them because have this attribute sincere and work on the timelines. Male need to change this biased behavior some times need to give chance to women to lead if they go wrong males should support them. I think the media should highlight this issue and let women get the opportunity to become leaders, women in health care need to keep fighting for what they deserve.

    Semantee Chattopadhyay
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    @semantee03
    #32983
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    Women hold a unique position in healthcare: they constitute over 80% of the health workforce yet they hold fever leadership positions. The recent UN high-level Commission on health employment and economic growth cause for action to “maximize women’s economic participation and foster their empowerment through institutionalizing their leadership addressing gender biases and inequities in education and help labour market and tackling gender concerns in health reform processes.” As heads of global health organisations and boards of global health organisations women constitute only 25% globally. Ministers of health worldwide are 31%. Women make up only 28% of Deans of top public health and medical schools. Although women constitute 90% of the long-term care workforce worldwide. Women’s leadership and health sciences are critical to advancing scientific enquiry which can be of unit interest to women scientists foster in the generation of new knowledge to improve health and healthcare. Women’s leadership in indigenous health reveals a similar gap contrary to the women’s traditional leadership roles.
    Gender refers to the socially prescribed and experience dimensions of “femaleness” and maleness in a society and is manifested at different levels. Gender is intimately connected to social political and economic status in systems. Women should be empowered as leaders in health. Empowerment can increase participation, visibility, and advancement of women in leadership positions to achieve transformative systemic change in healthcare health sciences and indigenous health contexts. There are various as well as facilitators experienced by women leaders in health. Patriarchal culture discrimination sexual harassment internalized sexism and colonialism, lack of mentors are some of the barriers experienced by women as health representatives. Culture of representation, gender equity initiatives, gender-focused leadership opportunities awesome facilitators for women leadership. Despite women being employed as doctors, nurses, pharmacists and other healthcare personnel, globally the data shows a consistent ack of gender parity in leadership.

    DISHA SAPKALE
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    @42disha
    #33322
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    There are many women who are doctors, nurses, community Health workers and more. But than also they don’t get chance of the leadership in health due to gender inequality. Women are giving their 100% in their work but than also they are getting compare with men. Why?, we all know that women’s are not getting equal pay like men even after doing equal work than also they don’t get equal opportunities and equal pay. This happen due to gender inequality and gender discrimination. Women do hardwork and take care of the patients 24/7 but than also they are not getting equal pay for their work than how will women’s be the part of the leadership. In this COVID-19 pandemic situation, there are many working women who stay at hospital leaving their child at home just to take care of the patients but than also women are underrepresentation as leaders in health. If women are getting the leadership men can’t take her success because of the ego due to which it leads to barriers in the women’s leadership. People need to understand that everyone should get a chance and equal opportunity, gender shouldn’t be the reason to not give an opportunity to that person instead their hardwork and talent should be the priority to give an opportunity to the person. Health care system need to give equal opportunities of leaderships in health to both men and women.

    Devishi Tandon
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    @devishi
    #34860
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    Isn’t it truly mind-boggling? Women account for 70% of the health and social care workforce, and they perform critical roles as nurses, midwives, and community health workers. They are the industry’s backbone, devoting their lives to caring for others. Nonetheless, despite their large presence, women frequently find themselves in the shadows when it comes to decision-making and leadership positions in the health sector. They appear to be out of the spotlight, especially in light of the COVID-19 response.
    You’d think that with such a strong presence in the industry, women would naturally be at the forefront of decision-making, wouldn’t you? But that is not the case. It’s as if an invisible barrier is preventing people from taking on leadership responsibilities and having their opinions heard. This gender disparity in health-care leadership is not only unjust but also harmful to advancement and innovation.
    Consider this. Women bring to the table diverse ideas and experiences. Their ideas can help to form legislation, promote research, and influence tactics that help patients and communities with a wide range of needs. We’re passing up a treasure of knowledge and expertise by removing them from decision-making. It’s the equivalent of leaving a critical jigsaw piece out of the image.
    Furthermore, in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, where healthcare services have been stretched to their breaking point, having women actively involved in determining the response is even more critical. Women have intimate knowledge of how the epidemic affects patients, families, and communities. Their involvement is critical for devising effective policies, reducing inequities, and ensuring a complete and inclusive approach to healthcare.
    So, what should be changed? It’s past time to tear down those barriers and provide greater possibilities for women to assume leadership positions. It’s more than just checking a box for diversity; it’s about recognising the great value and contributions that women bring to the table. We need gender equality policies, mentorship programmes to help ambitious female executives and a culture transformation that recognises and rewards women’s ability in the health field.
    Allow credit where credit is due. It is past time to place women at the forefront of decision-making, empowering them to influence the future of healthcare and lead us to a more fair and inclusive world.

    Let me give you a real-life example of women’s underrepresentation in healthcare leadership and their absence from the forefront of the COVID-19 response.
    Dr. Bonnie Henry rose to prominence in British Columbia, Canada, during the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Henry, as Provincial Health Officer, was instrumental in coordinating the province’s response to the epidemic. Her knowledge, calm demeanour, and strong communication abilities established her as a reliable source of information and advice for the public.
    Dr. Henry’s ability to lead and make decisions was well recognised and acknowledged, particularly her emphasis on evidence-based initiatives and prioritising community health and safety. She confronted the pandemic’s issues hard on, devising efforts to flatten the curve and safeguard vulnerable groups.
    Nonetheless, despite the great achievements of people such as Dr. Bonnie Henry, women in health-care leadership continue to be underrepresented. While Dr. Henry’s example is inspiring, it is the exception rather than the rule. When it comes to taking major leadership roles in the health sector, many women with equivalent skills and qualifications are sometimes disregarded or face difficulties.
    This example emphasises the importance of systematically breaking down these obstacles, ensuring that talented and capable women have equal opportunity to shape decision-making, lead responses to health crises, and contribute significant insights in healthcare leadership roles.
    We can aspire for a society where women’s voices are heard, their knowledge is appreciated, and their contributions are honoured by recognising the accomplishments of women like Dr. Bonnie Henry and actively striving to establish a more inclusive and gender-equal health industry.

    In conclusion, the underrepresentation of women in health sector leadership, as well as their absence from the forefront of the COVID-19 response, demonstrates a substantial discrepancy. Despite accounting for 70% of the health and social care profession, women are frequently left out of decision-making processes. Dr. Bonnie Henry’s great leadership, for example, exemplifies the value that women bring to the table. It is critical to break down barriers and promote gender equality in healthcare leadership in order to capitalise on women’s competence and various viewpoints. We can develop a more inclusive and effective healthcare system that meets the interests of all persons by actively incorporating women in decision making.

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