Get Inspired, Be Empowered Forums Water & Sanitation Period poverty and stigma

12 replies, 12 voices Last updated by Manpreet Singh 1 month, 2 weeks ago
  • Shubhangini Shaktawat
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    @shaktawat9
    #32817
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    Period poverty and stigma
    Period poverty is basically the lack of menstrual hygiene or shortage of access to menstrual hygiene or menstrual education and anything and everything in relation to it in terms of medical facilities, healthcare facilities, waste management, sanitation facilities, etc. Stigma, usually social in nature, is the negative attitude or opinion or discrimination against a person based on distinguishable characters that make him/her different as compared to others. Period poverty in today’s date is leaving a large negative impact on a huge number of children, men and women. Social stigma causes period poverty in a great scale. There are multiple ill-effects of the stereotypical thoughts that inculcate this stigma in people’s minds. The society has made this social stigma act like a curse to all women out there. Stereotypical religious, traditional and customary beliefs have made periods look like an evil and demonic process which causes the entire society to discriminate against women and females. It is considered taboo, which is the main reason behind the lack of menstrual hygiene, education, sanitation and healthcare facilities, etc. Some traditional beliefs say, women cannot enter the kitchen, or visit temples, or touch food and water, or some of them do not even step into their own homes when they are on their periods. In rural areas, girls still use old rags or pieces of cloth in place of pads or sanitary napkins. They’re treated like untouchables and this is a sort of torture. They fall ill very often and catch serious diseases and illnesses due to lack of education, facilities in the presence of these social stigmas. It negatively impacts women and girls as they have to drop out of school or work at times and they also lose out on a number of educational and economic opportunities due to the same. It should not remain to be considered taboo as it is a natural process. It should be normalized and children, both boys and girls should be provided free of cost menstrual education starting from primary school, carried on till later years in life. This would largely help the coming generations in the educational, medical and stereotypical aspect. It would free them of this social stigma and periods, sex and puberty will cease to be taboos, social stigmas and women will be able to gain the respect they deserve in the society.
    A woman myself,
    Shubhangini Shaktawat

    Semantee Chattopadhyay
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    @semantee03
    #32955
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    Fundamentally in our language with think of menstruation as this untouchable, shameful subject that we do not talk about. One of the main reasons that period for poverty hasn’t him at rest as a public health crisis is Stigma. What is stigma? Social stigma is the disapproval of discrimination against a person based on perceivable social characteristics that serve to distinguish them from the other members of society. It is one of the first and foremost valuable phenomena that distinguish males from females. It also marks in a body can become pregnant. As society created gender norms centuries ago, the menarche, which marks the first period, suddenly became the milestone when gender roles were constructed. Period stigma has fostered menstruation to be a taboo subject. We are not aware that period poverty exists. There are girls all over the world as young as 10 years old or 18 years old who have been missing school routinely due to menstruation due to the simple fact that they couldn’t afford sanitary products. This number amounts to 800 million. They have to choose between the education they deserve and the horrific primitive alternatives like toilet paper, old socks etcetera. It’s atrocious and unacceptable and this needs to stop. Period poverty is robbing young girls of their childhood. This is because menstruation is something that we hide and keep to ourselves and that menstrual hygiene is not a right, it is a privilege. The idea of menstrual hygiene not being right is the basis of such a huge problem. Period poverty has been neglected majorly by the social justice movement too. Period poverty can be defined as not being able to afford period products due to lack of income.
    The menstrual movement is the fight against period poverty and period stigma. It is the fight for it to table access to menstrual hygiene. Sanitary products are essential products that every woman should have access to. “Meeting the hygiene needs of all adolescent girls is a fundamental issue of Human Rights, dignity and public health.”- Sanjay Wijesekera, former UNICEF chief of water sanitation and hygiene.

    Manpreet Singh
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    @manpreet
    #33303
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    According to a survey of health workers in 30 countries by Plan International, Plan International, the coronavirus crisis leaves girls and women worldwide struggling to manage their periods with many confronting severe commodity shortages, sharp price increases, and lack of basic information and service access. This survey was released in conjunction with World Menstrual Health Day and draws on professional evidence from menstrual hygiene, water, sanitation, hygiene, and sexual health rights. Before the pandemic, there were several problems, but the virus exacerbates the situation. We already know that the pandemic of coronavirus has severe effects on family finances around the world. But now we also see that girls and women face a massive shortage and price increases for period products, which forces many to do what they can to manage their time. This can pose a serious threat to your health and the risk of infection may increase. Period stigma causes and has negative consequences for females because of gender inequality.
    Activists have been pursuing improved information on menstruation health, free products, and more for decades. However, the government and the media are just recently gaining momentum in the provision of period items. The movement has been more and more prominent since roughly 2015. Initiatives and campaigns go hand in hand. However, the common aspect of most of these efforts is that they focus on the product. The bigger concern, stigma, may be missed by placing the pad, the tampon, the cup, or the pants first.
    However, people need more than pads, information, and assistance. There is no doubt that access to things is very crucial. But, after a deeper reflection, (partly) the same old tabu continues. As Professor Chris Bobel observes in her latest work on women, gender, and sex studies, the pleasant time in the span of time that we don’t see or know. Cover it, cover it up, and live on. The underlying truth we seldom deal with or see is messy.

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