Get Inspired, Be Empowered Forums Gender Justice Quran Prescribes Hijab For Men Also! Do You Know?

3 replies, 3 voices Last updated by Manpreet Singh 2 years, 7 months ago
  • Woospire
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    PALAK KASHIV
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    It is true that Quran prescribes the hijab for both Muslim men and women both, the reason behind wearing hijab they should not show their private parts they should dress modestly. But very few Muslims men wear it and for most Muslim women it is compulsory for them to wear it. Men should wear a hijab during prayers and on their festivals and there is a lot of rigid commandments which we read on their online sites behind these all-religious beliefs are attached. Also, it is said that the hijab of men cannot be tight, mostly it should be of white and green or any other color but not red. Also, they people who religiously follow Quran they are not allowed to trim their beard. Wearing a hijab is part of their Islamic values these values are highly visible. The hijab is a symbol of Islamic tradition, but now only a few people know and understand the connotations that hijab hold, when a woman wears a hijab we can form an image in our mind but it is not the same in the case of men, hijab is just not the headscarf but it also has a deeper meaning which applies on both men and women. You will be shocked that it is written in Quran that wearing a hijab is first to mention to men and then women. There are some sexist men who don’t wear a hijab but they will force women to wear the hijab against their will, you cannot force anyone until and unless you are not applying the same on yourself.

    Semantee Chattopadhyay
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    When people grow up in a Muslim household from a young age, they are made aware of the various codes of conduct that they must follow. In the Quran, many values and traditions are mentioned which guide the behaviour of an individual in a society.. all these religious doctrines are to be accepted and respected. In practice, many of these doctrines become exclusively women-centric. As per Wikipedia, “Hijab is a head covering worn in public by some Muslim women. It is the religious code which governs the wearing of the hijab.” The truth is Quran prescribes Hijab for men also.
    Surah Al-A’raf (7:26-31) addresses righteousness and piety as more important than the physical covering of our body. “O Children (of) Adam! Verily We have sent down to you clothing, it covers your shame and (as) an adornment. But the clothing (of) [the] righteousness-that (is) best. That (is) from (the) Signs of Allah so that they may remember.”
    The Quran mentions that the first type of Hijab is our eyes. We should not invade the personal space of another being through staring or glaring which is the first and foremost principle behind the Hijab. When Islam was trying to reform the chastity and modesty of the community, it wasn’t just saying to reform women. It was trying to reform everyone. Main women both had to have an observance of that complete package known as Hijab. Many times we say that women should be wearing the head covering and have a good Hijab but for the men, if they show respect and lower the gaze the context will be different altogether. Many people miss the whole point of this altogether. They put the burden of wearing a Hijab on women. For some reason, people think that they can simply force women to observe Hijab. Prophet Muhammad was clear: in Islam, there is no permission for men to force hijab on women.

    Manpreet Singh
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    One is young and aware of the many rules of behaviours that you are required to observe, growing up in an Indian Muslim household. These ethics frequently adhere to Qur’anic ideals and customs and guide a person’s behaviour in a society. All religious doctrines must be accepted and adhered to theoretically by themselves. In practise, however, certain of these ideas are centred entirely on women and represent society standards rather than religious morality. You are included in society’s standards that have developed extra time and are a rule-making instrument for the dominant crowd.
    It’s not the other way around, but the case of a society that determines religion. One such example is the Islamic Hijab concept as it is known today. When I went to write the post, I looked for viewpoints on the hijab for men from men and women. Focusing on the comprehension, though not without expectation, of women’s hijab for men rather than of the importance of Hijab as a concept for males is more common. It is clear evidence of the common discourse that Hijab has been so closely related to women that the name itself gives us the picture of the woman wearing a Hijab. Hijab is widely spoken of in the modern world as a head-covering. It became a hotly contested subject, especially because in Western countries such as France it was banned.
    While many consider Hijab as a submissive religious doctrine, the hijab has increasingly been accepted by Muslim women around the world as a mark of identity and authority. It is not an oppressive force for them, but a liberal force that offers Islamophobia a counter-thesis. The discourse and discussion around the Hijab relate to its understanding exclusively, that is to say, the head covering, as a physical meaning. It is the mention of men and with it the concept of hijab and its different connotations, as stated in the Quran, that is wrong in this dialectic of opinion. A famous incident by Prophet Muhammad, and his cousin Al-Fadl bin Abbas, might be looked at to complete this brief understanding of the Hijab with its correct meanings. Prophet Mohammed (S.A.W) stopped on his journey with his cousin to deliver the people their judgments and respond to their inquiries. There came to him for a question about Hajj a gorgeous woman of the Khath’am tribe. The Prophet, when he realized that Al-Fadl bin ‘Abbas was looking at a woman, enamored by her beauty, silently took back his hand and turned his cousin’s face away.

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